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Facebook effort to stop revenge porn involves sending nudes

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Facebook effort to stop revenge porn involves sending nudes

Facebook has made an effort to stop revenge porn spreading through the platform and it involves sending nudes. Facebook has launched a pilot program in Australia to help stop the spread of revenge program. The effort will basically work as a reverse image search for nude photos. The program, however, involves you submitting your own nudes to scan the rest of the platform for a match.

The pilot program is being run in partnership with the Australian government’s eSafety division. It allows you to scan Facebook, Messenger, Facebook groups, and Instagram for your own nude photos after you fill out a form on the eSafety Commissioner’s website. You then send the nude photo in question to yourself through Facebook Messenger and allow Facebook to use “image matching technology” to see if the photo is being spread without your consent. Facebook then turns he photo into a series of numbers that are basically used to block attempts to upload the image on the various platforms. Finally, Facebook encourages users to delete the photo they sent to themselves via Messenger.

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The company does not store the photo but does store the hash (or the series of numbers) created to scan for the photo. A human will review the images you submit via Messenger to determine whether the image would classify as revenge porn. Facebook will hold onto the images for a short period of time, though those images would be blurred and only available to a small number of people.

Facebook’s head of global safety, Antigone Davis, said:

“The safety and well-being of the Facebook community is our top priority. As part of our continued efforts to better detect and remove content that violates our community standards, we’re using image matching technology to prevent non-consensual intimate images from being shared on Facebook, Instagram, Facebook Groups and Messenger.”

Australian e-Safety Commissioner Julie Inman Grant told ABC:

“It would be like sending yourself your image in email, but obviously this is a much safer, secure end-to-end way of sending the image without sending it through the ether. They’re not storing the image, they’re storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies. So if somebody tried to upload that same image, which would have the same digital footprint or hash value, it will be prevented from being uploaded.”

My name is Kriszti Bottyan (23) and I am the Editor of Teenzone Magazine. This means that all content goes through me before it reaches you. I graduated from the University of Pretoria in 2015 and I am currently completing my post-grad in Applied Languages. I am admittedly addicted to E! but I am also into the more serious content about society and about topics concerning YOUR future. Ultimately, you are my number one priority. We have migrated to a digital platform that is more suitable to you, our readers. We are continuously grateful for your support and in return promise to deliver. We will not disappoint!

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